Wonder Woman movie review

Of all the superheroines whether in illustration or live action, Wonder Woman is the only superheroine that stands above all. She is the ideal example of women empowerment. Created in 1941 during World War II, she was created by William Moulton Marston for DC Comics when he was tasked to create a female superhero.
 
Photo credit: Warner Bros.
Back then, there were already feminists in American society and it is good that she was created almost equally powerful as Superman. Among all comic book characters, only Wonder Woman has the longest running series. Even though there are favorites like Catwoman, Elektra, Black Widow and recently, Jessica Drew, most of these don’t last long because some of the comic industry cannot maintain a female protagonist even though we are now inclusive, we still think patriarchal.
                                                                                                                   
Although Lynda Carter is considered a pop culture icon for bringing Wonder Woman to life, the TV series has its limitations and there limitations in special effects back then. The movie shows that there is more to Wonder Woman than fighting saboteurs because Wonder Woman has mystical and ancient roots in Greek mythology because of her Amazon background.

Gal Gadot is given the title role not only she looks Mediterranean specifically Israeli but she has the presence of a femme fatale which is good for this new Wonder Woman image.

Her fighting technique is not just superior but there is also some influence in ancient Greek martial arts called Pankraton. Even when she is carrying her sword and shield, the fighting technique looks like from Mediteranean or Roman form. My only concern for Wonder Woman was, she never seemed to be battle damaged. She just crossed the battle lines and she is still unscratched.

Unlike her predecessor, Gal Gadot was seen first as Wonder Woman in Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice with a GodKiller sword and shield as major weapons besides the Lasso of Truth. This was adapted from the New 52 image of Wonder Woman in comic books to show her Amazon characteristics.

The movie was set in World War I instead of WWII which was before the time she was first created. For Steve Trevor (played by Chris Pine), he is the spy that fits the timeline but not as suave as the one I saw in a Justice League animated series.

Overall, the story was a real epic. Director Patty Jenkins did good retelling the origin story of Wonder Woman in the cinematic universe. I haven’t seen another good story like this since Chris Nolan’s Dark Knight trilogy. Now, the expectations for future movies like the upcoming Justice League and Aquaman which is now in production are high.


There are no Easter Eggs in this movie that will connect to Justice League and there are no end-credit scenes. Now, I am really excited for Justice League more than ever. For more geeky movie reviews, follow this blog and like https://www.facebook.com/LENSblogs/ on Facebook.

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